Why Are People Using Virtual Platforms?

The embedded software contained in modern electronic products has evolved dramatically in recent years along three dimensions:

  • Scale: The use of embedded software operating on standardized hardware platforms has become increasingly common as the cost of IC hardware production increases. This has driven up the sheer volume of code required for each project, and the effort to produce it.
  • Complexity:┬áThe new 64 bit and multi-core processor architectures have been continually improved, providing the necessary performance and capability to meet modern product requirements. However, coding for these new processors has become exponentially more complex than previous generations.
  • Quality: Modern electronic product functionality and quality requirements continue to increase dramatically, suggesting a zero tolerance for post-production bugs. In addition, embedded software has become harder to change as a product moves into production.

In the past, embedded software development and verification was typically performed by running code on a prototype of the hardware platform until the project team was satisfied that a working system had been achieved. This solution is time-consuming, unreliable in terms of quality and hard to use, making it impractical for next generation embedded software development. Similarly to hardware verification 15 years ago, new thinking must be applied if high quality embedded software is to be produced in a timely fashion.

Virtual platforms offer an alternative to hardware prototypes. Software models of the key components in a processor platform are combined to form an executable sub-system. The models must have enough functionality to execute the code correctly, but retain a level of abstraction that provides the performance necessary for rigorous testing.

To read more about why Virtual Platforms are being adopted read here.


Currently available Imperas / OVP Virtual Platforms / Virtual Prototypes.

FamilyVirtual Platform / Virtual Prototype
ARM Based Platforms    BareMetalArm7Single BareMetalArmCortexADual BareMetalArmCortexASingle BareMetalArmCortexASingleAngelTrap BareMetalArmCortexMSingle AlteraCycloneV_HPS ArmIntegratorCP ArmVersatileExpress ArmVersatileExpress-CA15 ArmVersatileExpress-CA9 AtmelAT91SAM7 ArmCortexMFreeRTOS ArmCortexMuCOS-II HeteroArmNucleusMIPSLinux FreescaleKinetis60 FreescaleKinetis64 FreescaleVybridVFxx AlteraCycloneV_HPS ArmIntegratorCP ARMv8-A-FMv1 ArmVersatileExpress ArmVersatileExpress-CA15 ArmVersatileExpress-CA9 AtmelAT91SAM7 ArmCortexMFreeRTOS ArmCortexMuCOS-II ArmuKernel Zynq_PS
MIPS Based Platforms    BareMetalM14KSingle BareMetalMips32Dual BareMetalMips32Single BareMetalMips64Single BareMetalMipsDual BareMetalMipsSingle HeteroArmNucleusMIPSLinux MipsMalta MipsMalta
Vendor Platforms    BareMetalNios_IISingle AlteraCycloneIII_3c120 AlteraCycloneV_HPS AlteraCycloneIII_3c120 AlteraCycloneV_HPS BareMetalArcSingle BareMetalArm7Single BareMetalArmCortexADual BareMetalArmCortexASingle BareMetalArmCortexASingleAngelTrap BareMetalArmCortexMSingle ArmIntegratorCP ArmVersatileExpress ArmVersatileExpress-CA15 ArmVersatileExpress-CA9 ArmIntegratorCP ARMv8-A-FMv1 ArmVersatileExpress ArmVersatileExpress-CA15 ArmVersatileExpress-CA9 AtmelAT91SAM7 AtmelAT91SAM7 FreescaleKinetis60 FreescaleKinetis64 FreescaleVybridVFxx Or1kUclinux ArmCortexMFreeRTOS ArmCortexMuCOS-II HeteroArmNucleusMIPSLinux ArmCortexMFreeRTOS ArmCortexMuCOS-II ArmuKernel ArmuKernelDual Quad_ArmVersatileExpress-CA15 BareMetalM14KSingle BareMetalMips32Dual BareMetalMips32Single BareMetalMips64Single BareMetalMipsDual BareMetalMipsSingle MipsMalta MipsMalta BareMetalOr1kSingle BareMetalM16cSingle BareMetalPowerPc32Single BareMetalV850Single ghs-multi RenesasUPD70F3441 ghs-multi RenesasUPD70F3441 Zynq_PL_DualMicroblaze Zynq_PL_NoC Zynq_PL_NoC_node Zynq_PL_NostrumNoC Zynq_PL_NostrumNoC_node Zynq_PL_RO Zynq_PL_SingleMicroblaze Zynq_PL_TTELNoC Zynq_PL_TTELNoC_node XilinxML505 XilinxML505 zc702 zc706 Zynq Zynq_PL_Default Zynq_PS